“Rosemarie Trockel: A Cosmos” presents an imaginary universe in which Trockel’s own artwork from the past thirty years is juxtaposed with objects and artifacts from different eras and cultures that map many of her artistic interests.


Although remarkably inventive and prolific, Trockel has deflected any identifiable stylistic signature: films and videos, knit paintings, projects for children, ceramics, drawings, and collages, plus a panoply of sculptures in a range of materials, are among the myriad forms that comprise her practice. Nonetheless, certain constants underpin this diverse activity: contending notions of feminism, purported antagonisms between the amateur and professional creator, the celebrity and the unknown maker, and between the fine, as opposed to the applied, arts and crafts. More broadly, Trockel probes interrelations between humans and animals, and our impact, as a species, on the natural world.
The epicenter of “Rosemarie Trockel: A Cosmos” is a small, tiled room devoted exclusively to the work of this mid-career German artist; reminiscent of aWunderkammer, it mixes the fantastical, the erotic, and the perverse. The exhibition spaces that radiate from this nucleus throughout the Museum’s three floors have been installed typologically, as in a traditional natural history museum, or thematically, as in many museums of modern art. 

“Rosemarie Trockel: A Cosmos” presents an imaginary universe in which Trockel’s own artwork from the past thirty years is juxtaposed with objects and artifacts from different eras and cultures that map many of her artistic interests.


Although remarkably inventive and prolific, Trockel has deflected any identifiable stylistic signature: films and videos, knit paintings, projects for children, ceramics, drawings, and collages, plus a panoply of sculptures in a range of materials, are among the myriad forms that comprise her practice. Nonetheless, certain constants underpin this diverse activity: contending notions of feminism, purported antagonisms between the amateur and professional creator, the celebrity and the unknown maker, and between the fine, as opposed to the applied, arts and crafts. More broadly, Trockel probes interrelations between humans and animals, and our impact, as a species, on the natural world.

The epicenter of “Rosemarie Trockel: A Cosmos” is a small, tiled room devoted exclusively to the work of this mid-career German artist; reminiscent of aWunderkammer, it mixes the fantastical, the erotic, and the perverse. The exhibition spaces that radiate from this nucleus throughout the Museum’s three floors have been installed typologically, as in a traditional natural history museum, or thematically, as in many museums of modern art.